15 Incredible Chemical Reactions

15 Incredible Chemical Reactions



Science is amazing! There are hundreds of strange but exciting chemical reactions known to science. Let’s take a look at some of the most incredible chemical reactions!

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Hermosa Minirosa
Hermosa Minirosa
13 days ago

Narrator: too dangerous to do this at home
Video: shows lots of backyard experiments by "ordinary" people.

Hermosa Minirosa
Hermosa Minirosa
13 days ago

@3:50 the chemical that is presented as great for rocketry is misleading. The rockets can ONLY work in the atmosphere where there is air and moisture with which to react, not in the vacuum of space.

Markus Federico
Markus Federico
13 days ago

Great work, razor sharp explained, health and safety pointed out, congratulations!

Gary O
Gary O
13 days ago

I have on order the chemicals used for these reaction, I look forwards to simulate these tests
………………..in my neighbor's garage.

Mystic Fallout
Mystic Fallout
13 days ago

I love science! But hate it when they say "this one you should not try at home!", yeah, sure, I know where to get this stuff. I'd LOVE to try a few of these at home, but Wal-Mart doesn't have a science and chemicals department.

Kraft Amt
Kraft Amt
13 days ago

Du redest zuviel…

Eero Tillanen
Eero Tillanen
13 days ago

Little correction: Dry ice is carbon dioxide so, it does not break up into hydrogen and oxygen but to carbon and oxygen. And yes, the oxygen is released in very active single-atom state and therefore probably reacts with aluminium, causing the ignition and ultimately explosion.

Caleb Anglin
Caleb Anglin
13 days ago

How did they get Charlie Sheen to narrate!?

john rico
john rico
13 days ago

In #4 you'd better use a penny that's 1981 date or earlier, because later pennies are zinc with a copper plating. Actually in 1982 year only, pennies were produced that were both mostly copper, such as the earlier ones, and zinc with copper plating.

Niels Andersen
Niels Andersen
13 days ago

Diethylzinc is useful in rocketry? If so, then which rocket is it used in? Sounds stupid to use a pyrophoric substance as hypergolic fuel when safer alternatives are easier to get, store, and handle.

Venkatesh Ks
Venkatesh Ks
13 days ago

Dry ice is solid carbon di oxide and does not contain hydrogen. This is about the comment on thermite reaction.

Rob Finch
Rob Finch
13 days ago

7.28 Dry ice " breaks down into hydrogen & oxygen"? No way, there is no hydrogen in "dry ice" its CARBON dioxide…

ZimZod Out
ZimZod Out
13 days ago

Waiting for chemical x cuz everything about these kind of content look nice…..but maybe!!

King Arthur
King Arthur
13 days ago

WUTTA!!!!

Kevin Erhart Jr.
Kevin Erhart Jr.
13 days ago

Did he say indoor fireworks?

Wavy Davy
Wavy Davy
13 days ago

That man at the beginning sounds so sincere that I've actually put my safety goggles and mask on 🤓

Martin A. M. Erickson, III
Martin A. M. Erickson, III
13 days ago

In the superheated liquid prsentation, the narrator claims the liquid warms because the reaction is "exothermic."

Chris
Chris
13 days ago

The way processes is pronounced is annoying

shexdensmore
shexdensmore
13 days ago

DRY ICE IS SOLID CO2
WHERE THE HELL DO YOU GET HYDROGEN FROM DRY ICE?
Furthermore, you need a very hot flame to Kickstart the thermite reaction. That's why you normally need a magnesium fuse or a torch.

shexdensmore
shexdensmore
13 days ago

I thought FRANCIUM was the most reactive metal's

john beach
john beach
13 days ago

Need to have the script proofread for errors before handing it over to the narrator. I've spotted a few important errors. Asside from the errors, was a pretty interesting video.

john beach
john beach
13 days ago

How can dry ice (frozen carbon dioxide) break down into oxygen and hydrogen?

john beach
john beach
13 days ago

@Whoop!

wolfrig2000
wolfrig2000
13 days ago

Hey, you're the simple history guy. That's cool, please don't advertise mobile games here. I hate those enough I will block your channel like I blocked simple history when they started shilling for Raids and other p2w scam games.

Cesare Vesdani
Cesare Vesdani
13 days ago

I like scientific experiments.

Joseph Astier
Joseph Astier
13 days ago

Pharoahs serpent does not go with my reality

Retro Crypt
Retro Crypt
13 days ago

@ 7:28 , I want to smoke that

W W
W W
13 days ago

**heat= exothermic

Caesium is also acidic in its crystal form

Pramjeet Singh
Pramjeet Singh
13 days ago

Indian lots of sants using this technology for making money
😂😂😂

Devine Nova
Devine Nova
13 days ago

Then lets build gummy bear rocket!!! Weeeeeeee

Mark
Mark
13 days ago

Where is the element 115 that people so sought after?

Richard Johnson
Richard Johnson
13 days ago

Damn dude, it's pronounced i-o-dine, not i-o-deen

PIGMENT RICH
PIGMENT RICH
13 days ago

Where do you find these chemicals in nature?

S T R O N K
S T R O N K
13 days ago

hot ice is not endothermic…
it’s exothermic. that’s why it’s hot and you don’t need to pump energy into it to keep it going

Bob Bob
Bob Bob
13 days ago

i love how he says dojt do this at home and shows people doing it at home lol

leiong leang
leiong leang
13 days ago

magic

Detective Mittens
Detective Mittens
13 days ago

This video is riddled with mistakes and stolen footage from other creators.

Bryan Ferry
Bryan Ferry
13 days ago

I use Himalayan pink salt.

Daryl Cheshire
Daryl Cheshire
13 days ago

Amateur chemistry was so much easier in the 1970s, now theres all these meth labs and precursor chemicals.
I despair on what budding chemists can do these days.

Daryl Cheshire
Daryl Cheshire
13 days ago

The reaction with nitric acid and copper releases nitric oxide NO which is colourless but turns into nitrogen dioxide on contact with oxygen. You can demonstrate this by collecting the gas under water in a jar. When exposed to air turns into the visible nitrogen dioxide. Bonus fact, it is not possible to smell nitric oxide as it immediately turns into nitrogen dioxide.

Daryl Cheshire
Daryl Cheshire
13 days ago

Sodium and potassium float on water and the explosion is on top of the water, caesium is heavier and the explosion occurs underwater and shatters most glass vessels.

TranscenDaMental
TranscenDaMental
13 days ago

3:11 an allusion to Jesus turning water into wine? Hmmm, seems wholly possible, maybe he was also a chemist? So many questions…I actually question all of HIStory, whomever he may actually be…

Random Homeschooled Weirdo
Random Homeschooled Weirdo
13 days ago

“Everyone’s familiar with copper.”

shows brass fittings

Mmhmm.